Daniel Altman

Is Syria a Pay-to-Play Conflict?

A quick look at whether defense money played a role in Congress authorizing Obama's war in Iraq and Syria.

Just a few months ago, hardly anyone was clamoring for American involvement in Syria. The drumbeat of casualties in the country's civil war had become monotonous, and any intervention was likely to have a strategic rather than a humanitarian rationale. Yet engaging in the conflict will be a huge boon for one group: the American arms industry.

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What Economists Don't Understand About Scots

Everyone from Paul Krugman to Joseph Stiglitz is weighing in on Scotland’s risky bet. But they don’t get the feeling of yes.

Should Scotland vote to leave the United Kingdom and become an independent nation? Economists think they know the answer. But why should anyone in Scotland listen to them?

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How to Get Away With Almost Anything

How evildoers benefit from the world's ADD.

How many big stories can you follow at the same time? The war in Ukraine? The Islamic State in Iraq? Jennifer Lawrence's nudie pics? If you're scheduling segments for television news or placing articles on a newspaper's homepage, probably not that many. But even if you're just a casual observer, you might not have the head space for more than two or three major events; after all, you have to worry about your work, family, and everything else as well. That's where things get interesting.

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Why Won't Apple Hire Me?

America's best -- and most cash-rich -- companies aren't helping fix the labor gap. But it's not because interest rates are too high.

Despite moderate growth in the economy and historically low interest rates, the American labor market still hasn't fully recovered since the big hit of the global financial crisis. True, the unemployment rate has fallen by 3.8 percentage points since its peak in 2009, but the percentage of Americans employed has barely changed. At last week's conference in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen and other worthies lamented the difficulty of using monetary policy to address this problem. But the questions they should be asking are more fundamental.

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5 Things to Know About the Global Economy Right Now

Why Japan is a wildcard, the Eurozone's in trouble, and the BRICS are a bust.

Things could be worse, right? Having shaken off the jitters that saw shares drop at the end of July, the major markets have been enjoying another period of relative stability. Apart from Argentina's comic default and a few geopolitical flare-ups, little has happened to raise fears of another crash. The unemployment rate has been falling steadily -- if slowly -- in the United States, Eurozone, and even Japan, where more people are also joining the labor force. Domestic demand has returned even as the fringes of the global economy have frayed. But is there a storm around the corner? Here are a few things to keep in mind as we look to the next couple of years:

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