The Best Defense

The Best Defense

Anatomy of a crime: Some reflections on the latest killings at Fort Hood

By John T. Kuehn, Ph.D. Best Defense guest columnist

In a 2005 meeting with the faculty at the Command and General Staff College (CSGC), a senior Army mental health professional acknowledged how woefully unprepared the Army mental health personnel and facilities were for the drastic increase in the numbers of people needing help for combat related stress ailments, including Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). At Fort Leavenworth, for example, there were about three to four counselors and therapists for an army community of several thousands, including nearly 1,400 field grade officers at CGSC -- most of whom had at least one combat deployment in either Iraq or Afghanistan, many more than one. The crisis was clear, the Army was unprepared, DOD was unprepared, but the first step to recovery is acknowledging that one has a problem.

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The Best Defense

Think you know something about Putin's bad intentions? Then give ODNI a call

Could be there's a fat job open for you at ODNI: Deputy National Intelligence Officer, Russia & Eurasia. I promise you it won't be boring. Some travel required. Oddly enough, the linked announcement says the contact address is on Baccarat Drive in Fairfax, which is kind of weird, because Google Earth fotos show that said road is a short residential street.

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The Best Defense

Comment of the day: CIA torturers are the moral equivalent of the North Vietnamese jailkeepers who tortured American pilots

I was intrigued by this comment, by "USAF Pilot-RET," which ran the other day in response to my post saying that if CIA officials want to practice civil disobedience, they should man up and take the consequences of civil disobedience:

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The Best Defense

General Mundy in his obituary deserved more than the back of the Post's hand

By Col. Butch Bracknell, USMC (Ret.) Best Defense guest columnist

The Washington Post's obituary following the passing of General Carl E. Mundy, Jr., the 30th commandant of the Marine Corps, could have benefited from some balance, perspective, and a dose of journalistic ethics. The Post can even make an obituary sensational. Writer Matt Schudel replows old dirt by resurfacing controversies surrounding certain of General Mundy's public statements. General Mundy, as a public figure, was of course not immune from criticism, and this writer would even wager that, if asked, General Mundy would want a do-over for certain public stances he took as commandant. Even so, Schudel's research appears to have been Wikipedia deep, as a mere cursory examination of the historical record might have led him also to note monumental successes on General Mundy's watch.

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