The Best Defense

Thoughts about Fallujah: I am worried that we're just not built to win anymore

By Master Sgt. Sean Lulofs, USAF (Ret.)
Best Defense guest columnist

Our nation has not won a war since World War II. I think America is unwilling to win a war.

The United States has won battles and conflicts, but it has not truly won a war which could clearly demonstrate victory as the defeat of the Axis Powers did. The enemy leadership was removed and new types of democratic governments put in place. Their militaries were disassembled and rebuilt so as to no longer pose a threat to other nations. It was clearly defined who won, who lost, and how. Our nation has maintained a presence in those countries since 1945. 

Unfortunately, that was the last time when America believed in true victory, as demonstrated by the lack of willpower in wars since.

The Korean War is technically still underway and peace is only maintained by a ceasefire. The Korean Peninsula is still fractured and not returned to its whole. The leadership of North Korea was never removed from power and their military remained intact. The North Koreans have remained a threat to all within their part of the world. They continue to attempt to draw the world into a symmetrical war by constantly escalating tensions through hostile actions. We have never stepped up and crushed the aggression they continue.

The Vietnam War was lost even though we were winning it. We had pushed our enemies back and they were on the verge of defeat. However, due to lack of support for the mission (a.k.a. the troops), the national leaders fled not only the battlefield but their commitment and responsibility to our military. The communists fully took the nation and their evil spread to other countries which fertilized the killing fields due to the vacuum created by the hasty withdrawal. There was no such thing as "support the troops" and our returning military was spat on, even though it was this nation which not only asked them to go to war, but many were sent by compulsory service.

The Gulf War was never truly won because, although Saddam Hussein was turned out of Kuwait, his army scorched the earth and left mostly intact. Iraq would remain a threat to coalition forces patrolling the skies over the northern and southern no-fly zones by repeatedly firing upon aircraft. Iraq would also remain a constant threat to its neighbors for the next 12 years through the threat of launching SCUD missiles armed with chemical and biological weapons.

Most recently, our nation entered into combat, and are still engaged, with non-traditional forces in Afghanistan under the banner Operation Enduring Freedom. Initially, the United States demonstrated the will to win and win decisively. This nation, with a multinational force, exacted a swift and violent response. The enemy and all sympathizers were terrified. Terrorist-supporting nations around the region began to disarm their nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons programs because of the resolve shown to win the war and win decisively. It is a region of the world that only understands strength and force, which is what we showed them.

Then Afghanistan was forgotten as our nation turned to Iraq for a simultaneous war known as Operation Iraqi Freedom. This divided attention neglected Afghanistan operations and allowed the enemy there to regroup and rearm. Iraq initially appeared to be a quick victory and morale was high in the U.S. military as we demonstrated our superiority against a sizable military with ease. The people of Iraq cheered and believed their futures would be bright as freedom appeared near. However, our country again entered into a campaign to appease the minority of loud and aggressive pacifists. The cowardice of our nation's politicians prevented them from making clearly defined rules of engagement. Years of weak leadership and poor tactical execution created the powder keg in Fallujah in 2004. Because the fools of politics are never students of history, it was doomed to be repeated by another hasty withdrawal of forces from the country. Again, another vacuum was created and it allowed the very same terrorists which were turned from Fallujah to return.

If our nation understood enemies in combat can only be defeated with violence of action, we wouldn't still be in Afghanistan and black flags wouldn't be flying over Fallujah. Our nation has fought the Taliban and al Qaeda as if they were sparring in the debate team. Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi freedom were fought in the media, not on the battlefield. The piss-poor leadership this nation has elected over the past 50 years have caused the current state we are in because our leaders have failed to fight a war. Instead they fought to keep public opinion at the cost of our military men and women's lives.

Lastly, our citizenry has failed to hold our national leadership accountable. Not only have they failed to hold our leaders accountable for completing the mission of the war, but for all the decisions regarding domestic and foreign policies. Our citizenry has abandoned their obligation to hold those in office accountable for their actions.

I lost several friends in Fallujah during those long seven months in 2004. A few more were lost over the last nine years due to returning to combat and one close friend was lost to his battle with PTSD.

None of our men or women lost in battle has died for nothing because they died defending freedom and their fellow soldiers. However, their loss is in vain when the leadership who sent them there to die refuse to carry out and complete the mission. If Americans truly did "support the troops," they would not only shake our hands as we walked through the airport, they would demand their politicians commit to a swift victory. Don't shake my hand, shake up your politicians.

"No bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. You won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country."

Sean Lulofs is the owner of Cogent K9 Canine Consulting Services. In the Air Force he was his service's military working dog program manager and Department of Defense military working dog action officer, as well as the antiterrorism officer for Lackland Air Force Base, Texas.

Sadam el-Mehmedy/AFP/Getty Images

The Best Defense

It's high time to dump the Confederate names tarring the honor of our Army

By "Soldiers Diary"
Best Defense guest columnist

It's 2014 and we still have Army bases named in honor of generals who fought for the Confederacy.  It's ridiculous, absurd, and time that these bases be renamed.

Jamie Malanowski last year wrote a fantastic op-ed for the New York Times titled "Misplaced Honor."  He detailed the numerous Army bases, mostly in the South, that are named after generals who fought for the South and were responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of Americans.  These bases include Fort Lee, Fort Hood, and Fort Bragg, to name but a few.

As we observe Martin Luther King Jr. Day, the U.S. Army should take a hard look at the names of Army installations across the United States and rename those installations.

It would be fitting to change Fort Bragg to Fort Gavin, the first commander of the 82nd Airborne Division and World War II hero.  Fort Hood could be renamed Fort Patton, Fort Rucker could be renamed Fort Marshall, and you could even rename Fort Lee, Fort Calrissian.  It sounds ridiculous at first, but not after taking into consideration the fact that Lando is not responsible for more American soldiers' deaths than were Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan combined. Nor did he lead a force in order to preserve a slavery-based economy.

We can still honor the soldiers who fought for the South, and monuments on the battlefields like Gettysburg are still appropriate.  However, in 2014, having bases named after the leadership of the Confederacy is just a bit outdated.  I do not speak for African-American soldiers, but I wonder if anyone has ever asked them if they feel it is appropriate.

This is not all the Army and the other services should do to advance in to the 21st century.  Other forms of absurdity continue that the military should take a stand against.  A start would be to end support such as providing a color guard for professional football games that involve the team from Washington D.C.  Call a spade a spade, recognize that the term "Redskin" is a derogatory term, and end support for that football team until Dan "Chainsaw" Snyder also realizes it is 2014.

"Soldiers Diary" is an active-duty Army officer. This article represents his own views, which do not necessarily reflect those of the U.S. Army, the Defense Department, or Dan Snyder .

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