The Best Defense

The Best Defense

The future of war (25): You better be ready to fight like it's a pre-electronic age

By Capt. Jesse Sloman, USMCR Best Defense future of war entry

The best way to predict the future of warfare is to look to its past.

Major battles in the 21st century will be confusing and disorganized affairs more similar to the clashes of a pre-digital age than the ‘network-centric' combat we've become accustomed to. A new generation of offensive technology targeting the electromagnetic spectrum -- systems such as cyberweapons, electronic jammers, anti-satellite missiles, and electromagnetic pulse (EMP) munitions -- will deprive militaries of the sensor and communications links they rely on. Forget 24-hour streaming video from a Predator drone. Armies of the future may struggle just to use their radios.

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The Best Defense

Tom's helpful suggestion of the day: Why doesn't the Army offer to fund the A-10?

I sympathize with the Army's belief that the A-10 is about the most helpful Air Force plane that now exists. A nice political move would be for the Army to put its money where its mouth is and offer to fund the A-10 for the Air Force. I mean, just write the check. As a friend says, combine it with photos of Air Force golf courses and fancy new headquarters buildings.

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The Best Defense

Rebecca's War Dog of the Week: Leska's Visit to the Dentist

By Rebecca Frankel Best Defense Chief Canine Correspondent

Maintaining a military working dog's health is crucial and handlers are given extensive training on how to care for their dogs -- from grooming them to administering emergency care in a combat scenario. They learn to read their dogs for signs of pain, dehydration, gastrointestinal issues, spider bites, and dental problems.

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The Best Defense

The New York Times op-ed page owes our vets a large and immediate apology

By Jesse Sloman Best Defense guest columnist

Kathleen Belew's New York Times op-ed "Veterans and White Supremacy" has generated a fierce response for its attempt to connect military service with membership in white supremacist groups. I hope that Dr. Belew and the Times editorial staff don't dismiss the palpable anger they've prompted in the veteran community as a knee-jerk reaction to an unflattering portrayal. Instead, alongside a sense of collective outrage at being subjected to tired and ill-informed stereotyping, most of the criticism I've read has been sober, thoughtful, well-informed, and centered around the op-ed's analytical flaws and inadequate research.

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