The Best Defense

The Best Defense

NDU: An investigation, MPs at the door, sudden leave and command climate Qs

 

You may remember that we've discussed troubles at the National Defense University before, and especially those involving its president, Maj. Gen. Gregg Martin. Here is a hair-raising update from an insider:

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The Best Defense

The eternal BS of higher headquarters: An example from German pilots in 1940

Best Defense is in summer re-runs. This post originally appeared on November 26, 2013.

One of the eternals of combat is that frontline fighters will always feel betrayed by the BS being peddled by top leaders. I thought of this when I read that during the summer of 1940, the German leaders kept saying that the Royal Air Force was on the verge of collapse. It didn't feel that way to Luftwaffe pilots, who supposedly would radio each other sarcastically as they crossed the British coast, "Here they come again, the last fifty British fighters."

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The Best Defense

Bad stuff in Iraq

Best Defense is in summer re-runs. This item originally ran on November 20, 2013.

Mayor of Fallujah shot and killed. Scores killed in bombings. This used to be big news but we have moved on. Funny how we can do that. And people ask why the Iraqis aren't more grateful.

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The Best Defense

Maps and charts (II): In 240 BC, it was clear in Egypt that the Earth was round and that it was 25,000 miles around

Best Defense is in summer re-runs. This item originally ran on November 25, 2013.

Another thing I learned in Lloyd Brown's The Story of Maps was that in 240 BC, Eratosthenes calculated not only that the earth was round, but also that it was roughly 24,000 miles in circumference.

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The Best Defense

We know the Army is about to get smaller. So here is how we can make it better.

By Michael M. Crow and John Paul Parker

Best Defense guest columnists

Following the longest conflict in our nation's history, the United States is about to downsize its Army. The "inside-the-beltway" policy debates now underway are focused squarely on how many soldiers we need, and can afford. This is the wrong focus. History demonstrates that the nation's defense planners cannot accurately foresee where we will need to send our soldiers, nor what we will ask them to do. What we do know is that wherever we send soldiers will be a complex and dangerous environment where we will expect them to be flexible, innovative, and adaptive in order to deal with unforeseen contingencies and emergent threats.

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